Speed matters for HR - How to Accelerate it!

by HOLGER MUELLER

Holger Mueller

Holger Mueller is Vice President and Principal Analyst for the fundamental enablers of the cloud, IaaS, PaaS with forays up the tech stack into BigData and Analytics, HR Tech, and sometimes SaaS.  Mueller provides strategy and counsel to key Constellation Research clients, including Chief Information Officers, Chief Technology Officers, Chief Product Officers, investment analysts, venture capitalists, sell side firms and technology buyers.

Prior to joining Constellation Research, Mueller was VP of Products for NorthgateArinso, a KKR company. There he lead the transformation of products to the cloud and laid the foundation for new Business Process as a service (BPaaS) capabilities. Previously Mueller was Chief Application Architect with SAP, working on strategic projects and next generation product capabilities. Mueller was also VP of Products for FICO, creating the foundation for the current Enterprise Decision Management Suite. Before he worked for Oracle in various management functions both on the application development (CRM, Fusion) and business development side. Previously he worked for SAP, starting the products suite that is currently SAP CRM and worked in the Office of the Chairman for Hasso Plattner. Mueller started his career with Kiefer & Veittinger, which he helped grow from a startup to Europe’s largest CRM vendor from 1995 onwards. There he helped  spearhead offshore development in Bangalore, India, where the previous K&V Lab is now SAP Labs Bangalore. Mueller has presented at numerous trade shows and industry events and writes his blog on enterprise software at enswmu.blogspot.com.

Mueller has a Diplom Kaufmann from University of Mannheim, with a focus on Information Science, Marketing, International Management and Chemical Technology. As a native European, Mueller speaks six languages.

Webinar Transcript

Announcer: Holger Muller is a vice president and principal analyst at Constellation Research Group for the fundamental enablers of the Cloud infrastructure as a service, past with forays up the text stack into big data and analytics and sometimes SAS. He provides strategy and council to chief information officers, chief technology officers, chief product officers, investment analysts, venture capitalists, cell-side firms, and technology buyers. Prior to Constellation, Holger was VP of products for North Data Rinso [SP], a KKR company, chief application architect with SAP, VP of products for Fico and worked for Oracle in various management functions. Earlier in his career, he worked for SAP starting the product sweep that is currently SAP-CRM. And worked in the office of the chairman for Hussle Platinum [SP]. Holger started his career with Keifer and Vetting [SP] which he helped grow from a startup to Europe's largest CRM vendor from 1995 onwards. As a native European, he speaks six languages. Please, welcome to Elevate 2015, Holger Muller.

Holger: Well, thank you so much for having me at this amazing online event. Pleasure to be here and speak to you today about why speed matters for HR and what can HR do to help the enterprise which they are the custodian of HR persons to accelerate. But before we delve into the HR specifics, let's understand the bigger picture and something we advice our customers and practitioners all the time is to take some step back, it doesn't have to be an offside or a planning meeting, but sometime where you are have some space to think world things, where would your business be five years from now, in 2020? You don't have to go the Easter Island but think about how it's going to change and think of the rate of change, how it's fundamentally happening.

And to give you a piece of thought, if you have the idea to start a taxi company five years ago, all the technology you would have acquired for running that, all the best practices for running that, passing out phone numbers, setting up call centers, getting rated, getting drivers and radios, buying cars for them, figuring out shift planning, understand the legal ramification, all of that would be obsolete today by popular ride sharing app, with companies like Uber and [inaudible 00:02:29].

So just think about that if you ran a taxi industry maybe someone is looking and listening here, how fundamental a change can be in five years. And what we also know is that by 2020 the change is going to be even faster. To give you some general guidelines on the challenges on the road ahead, there is four higher level trends which are really made up, which can help you with this.

First of all, there is macro economic trends, which you can't influence. This is who is going to be president of the United States, what is the EU going to do about immigration. There is also other external things, even beyond political government area, like there's a flooding in Thailand and that means that 80% of the hard disk production is going to be disrupted. There's nothing you can do about it. You can try to extrapolate them and use them, but that's what you have to keep in mind.

Second one, very close to HR already, it's the dynamic work force. We'll talk about it much, much more. Different generations in the work force, 20% of time makes 10 years in North America. Lots of changes happening.

The third one which we'll touch a lot here is disruptive technology adoption. For the first time, the time we live in, technology can do more than what best practices in the business and what reality and how we do things can be supported.

And that creates the fourth thing, new digital business models. I went through the example in the ride-sharing side with Uber before. New digital business models are created and disrupt our traditional business models. So keep up with these four things that [inaudible 00:03:57] general help for you. Because things are getting faster, one statistic now getting more and more popular [inaudible 00:04:03] 52% of the Fortune 500 companies are gone which were part of that index in 2000. So there's now 15 years, I think we have to re-up the numbers, the number's even bigger. It doesn't mean necessarily they are totally gone, ceased to exist, but they are no longer part of that index because it didn't grow fast enough, they got acquired, they merged, or they might be really no longer in business. So we've never seen this rate of change.

Another example to illustrate that is the S&P 500. If you join the S&P 500 back in 1957 when I took this arbitrary date because then the average age of the company making it was 75 years old, three quarters of a century. Meaning that they were founded a century before. Fast forward to 2003, it's 25 years old, only one third of the age. So in the span of, you have to do the math, 43, 46 years, that span has come down by over 66% down to one-fourth. And further 10 more years only, to 2013, the average age of the company joining the S&P 500 is 10 years old only. We need to redo that stat for 2015, I don't that number is going to go up.

And what do boardrooms see and what do they say for priorities for this year? And I picked the ones that are close to HR professionals. The number one is "development for higher performance culture." We'll be touching many of these things here. It is very clear that humans, people play a key role in how companies want to operate in the next 10, 20, 30 years. All the talk about robots in the side, but you have to have a high performance culture to attract the right individuals, to keep the right individuals motivated at work, and get those changes you need to see that are coming.

The second one is very important, "readiness for inorganic growth." It's very clear for companies that mergers and acquisitions, strategic partnerships will be happening, will keep happening, and they will keep happening at an even faster scale. For the people in those enterprise means you must have much better skill set and a much more robust nervous system when these things are happening. And so there's a certain point, there's a low stimulus reaction on that already for some people but our mindset was that has become that this is a normal part of life, how business is done, compare and contrast with the lifelong employment model, which is part of history now.

The "mass automation of work and thought," is really interesting because given the retirement [inaudible 00:06:27] North America faces in the next 10 years, the hand-to-machine ratio, the automation ratio, how business operates in North America, has to fundamentally change. You either have to keep it same ratio and find more hands, and you won't find them in North America so it means you have to offshore your operation. You may do that on the tail-end of globalization. Or you have to find significantly higher wins in productivity and we talk about them, some examples later, then the usual two, three percent efficiency of the existing enterprise after automation and the existing best practices would give you.

Then "efficiency in post merger integration," that's a logical consequence of the second point. If you do the strategic partnership, we do this acquisitions, if you do this mergers, the speed of doing business matters a lot. Anybody flying, to make an example, there's another great case, any body flying with United and trying to figure out is Continental plane or crew can see that right away and shows how expensive and efficient the slow post merger integration process is.

"Cost reduction of regulatory and security compliance" is very important because they are number that cost is going to go up. Enterprise need to find a way how to manage that, how to do that. So keep these things as a more immediate thing in mind right away.

There are three mega trends. And we touched one of them already. The Italian lady on the right who is showing the cornuto sign, that retiring population, 20% in the next 10 years. Probably not 20% because these numbers are as the economic people say [inaudible 00:07:56] with no assumption of changes or how congress, the CBM, does it to stop exploring, probably I think people will be working longer, enterprise will motivate them to work longer, the emergence of under time and software is one of the things we predict here at Constellation happening, enterprise finding the right talent and motivating employees to work maybe part-time, maybe become a consultant or freelancer, but work longer.

Next one is globalization on the left side with bigger workload. Business getting more and more global. A friend of mine has run the T-shirt company in San Diego and of course he has San Diego on his pictures, he was caught by surprise Fall of last year that almost one third of his orders via his website were going to Latin America because, surprise, there is other places called San Diego and they like the T-shirts. And all of a sudden, he is having problems with customer service in Spanish, taking out tax deduction, compliance pieces, what are the warranty returns policies and so on. So globalization is a force to reckon with. It's also an opportunity I mentioned before when we talk about the hand-to-machine ratio.

And then disruption and big data, that's sort of like this kind of cloud over there. We talked about the risks but as well as the benefits of that a little later.

And lastly, this changes dramatically. You know the statistics of the market leaders take 50% of the revenue and a little more for profitability from our research, and if you do transform market, the vendors take even more which means you have to pay even more attention to changes happening in the market place and you have to adopt them even faster and you only adopt them through people. And people and employees do really matter, they are the biggest cost of most enterprises, except for some [inaudible 00:09:39] intensive ones, and getting more out of the employees, getting more out of your people, retaining them longer, putting them in the right place, is really a strategic success factor for enterprise going forward.

And what matters to them lots of talk about engagement, I don't want to bore you with this [inaudible 00:09:53] Carnegie survey, 71% of employees are not engaged. Important part of that, to look at that across the different generations which are in the work force, it's really something for you to look at going forward and making sure your employee work force is engaged.

And the other part we mentioned before survey from SHRM here, that 20% of the work force is going to retire in North America within the next 10 years. But the scary scenario, even scarier [inaudible 00:10:23] here that most HR professionals are not tracking how many people are retiring 3 to 5 years from now, only in a very short timeframe, not on a longer timeframe at all. So be aware of these changes. I've mentioned this already, a little self-promotion here on the HR tech trend slide, employee and people cost will only find a way up. But it's come to the key part of the presentation here to give you some background, what are the key drivers for HR and to pick up speed and I will walk you though each of these nine in more detail in a second.

So let's start with Business User Centricity. In the past, software had been written for, remember the very early days of the mainframe when IT people wear white robes and they're looking like doctors, they were written for engineers. Then it was written for the IT professional. Then it was written for the trained professional who could man and would go for, making an example here, three months to Valdorf, Germany, to learn about how SAP works. And now we see the trend on software is getting more usable, easier to use. The wide availability of smartphones and tablets, the consumerizaton of IT makes it possible that business users can ran things.

And what other form to accelerate an enterprise closer to get that manager, that executive, for us to make a decision right away in the spot to make a call. We talk about some of the techniques in a second, but business users centricity is something to go forward. It can't be no longer the division [inaudible 00:11:53] person, even closer to what they usually have at this event around recruiting, it can't be usually any more than recruitment going forwards. It might be scary information for the traditional recruiter here. But think about what it means for a manager if he or she is unable to directly make talent shift information decisions right away on the fly and talent acquisitions right away on the fly.

BigData Enablement is a key driver on this VCO revolution happening here that for the first time enterprises can store all the electronic information that they can get a hold off for a fraction of the cost of, it cost them in the past to keep that information the traditional silos, requests could not be asked. Traditionally you had to know which questions had to be asked before you could build any business intelligence. What an oxymoron, something like [inaudible 00:12:41] solutions. You had to ask this before. With the BigData, how [inaudible 00:12:49] revolution that you see, not only the cost goes down, but you can ask the questions afterwards you collected the data. And you can enrich it with a party data. So you can make decisions on your HR people by importing third-party salary information, fluctuations, to attrition information, all kinds of engagement statistics, with social media profile of your employees, correlate that with your firewall data. So there's lots of more data in the future happening thanks to the BigData revolution that you see right now.

The third one is, that on top of that, if you have the data, true analytics will really result an impact for HCM and change decision making. And the overall trend that we see, I always use it as an analogy, the intelligence, the thing which makes software work and enables best practice on top of software. And talent is more in front of the screen, which typically is [inaudible 00:13:45] today, to behind the screen. Meaning, it's no longer the human asking the system questions, it will not go away, that ability will stay. But it's the system which will answer questions for the human before the human even asks them. Finding anomalies, finding things which should be wrong and even finding the time on your agenda to say, "Hey, this is so urgent, here's your SMS text. You have to take action on that. This is time but it's a little more in different time, I need 15 minutes in your agenda. Friday afternoon is great." That's the future of how information will be discovered in the form of analytics.

But let's talk about what true analytics really are. And I'm a harsh grade on analytics. Analytics are only if they take an action for you, or if they make a force rank recommendation to you. One example for an action is the ABS and the detraction system, and the Moose Test, which if you're from Scandinavia where at a certain speed, I used a little pictogram on the bottom right, you have to swerve up over to avoid the moose and then go back because there is oncoming traffic. Standard test for cars in Sweden. Not always sold by them, sold by software and why doesn't it work by software like ABS? Because it takes the action to keep you safely on the street or brakes for you in the case of the ABS.

Or you can even take an actual example. Great analytics example, too, of course, it was cheating what Volkswagen did with the smog test. But I'll tell you, that car figured out by itself, with no help from the outside, with no connection to the internet that it's going to do a smog test and took action, changed the way how the engine worked. So great analytics example of course from a moral perspective, really, really bad and might ruin the whole company.

And what other form to accelerate an enterprise closer to get that manager, that executive, for us to make a decision right away in the spot to make a call. We talk about some of the techniques in a second, but business users centricity is something to go forward. It can't be no longer the division [inaudible 00:11:53] person, even closer to what they usually have at this event around recruiting, it can't be usually any more than recruitment going forwards. It might be scary information for the traditional recruiter here. But think about what it means for a manager if he or she is unable to directly make talent shift information decisions right away on the fly and talent acquisitions right away on the fly.

BigData Enablement is a key driver on this VCO revolution happening here that for the first time enterprises can store all the electronic information that they can get a hold off for a fraction of the cost of, it cost them in the past to keep that information the traditional silos, requests could not be asked. Traditionally you had to know which questions had to be asked before you could build any business intelligence. What an oxymoron, something like [inaudible 00:12:41] solutions. You had to ask this before. With the BigData, how [inaudible 00:12:49] revolution that you see, not only the cost goes down, but you can ask the questions afterwards you collected the data. And you can enrich it with a party data. So you can make decisions on your HR people by importing third-party salary information, fluctuations, to attrition information, all kinds of engagement statistics, with social media profile of your employees, correlate that with your firewall data. So there's lots of more data in the future happening thanks to the BigData revolution that you see right now.

The third one is, that on top of that, if you have the data, true analytics will really result an impact for HCM and change decision making. And the overall trend that we see, I always use it as an analogy, the intelligence, the thing which makes software work and enables best practice on top of software. And talent is more in front of the screen, which typically is [inaudible 00:13:45] today, to behind the screen. Meaning, it's no longer the human asking the system questions, it will not go away, that ability will stay. But it's the system which will answer questions for the human before the human even asks them. Finding anomalies, finding things which should be wrong and even finding the time on your agenda to say, "Hey, this is so urgent, here's your SMS text. You have to take action on that. This is time but it's a little more in different time, I need 15 minutes in your agenda. Friday afternoon is great." That's the future of how information will be discovered in the form of analytics.

But let's talk about what true analytics really are. And I'm a harsh grade on analytics. Analytics are only if they take an action for you, or if they make a force rank recommendation to you. One example for an action is the ABS and the detraction system, and the Moose Test, which if you're from Scandinavia where at a certain speed, I used a little pictogram on the bottom right, you have to swerve up over to avoid the moose and then go back because there is oncoming traffic. Standard test for cars in Sweden. Not always sold by them, sold by software and why doesn't it work by software like ABS? Because it takes the action to keep you safely on the street or brakes for you in the case of the ABS.

Or you can even take an actual example. Great analytics example, too, of course, it was cheating what Volkswagen did with the smog test. But I'll tell you, that car figured out by itself, with no help from the outside, with no connection to the internet that it's going to do a smog test and took action, changed the way how the engine worked. So great analytics example of course from a moral perspective, really, really bad and might ruin the whole company.

So action has to be taken. It's not going to be something visible. And we see these analytics not just in cars, but we see them everyday. Google now is now waking up over 10 million people everyday and the wake up call is something very intimate to most of us, so we think about it for many, many times where to move it because everybody probably likes to sleep longer or do something else before they jump to their commute. But to mess with that and figuring like what are the road conditions, is there an accident on the road, all the way to now figuring out that you might be out of gas and need five minutes to fill up, Google now will adjust your wake up call for that.

Another example is Waze, very popular navigational application also. Telling you where to go and where to move on the fly in real time. So you're taking this actions, they're recommendations we don't know if you do them. Another example are cockpits in airplanes, or even buying decisions as an example here on a very popular traveling website, Kayak. It's telling you, "Hey, the confidence for you to buy now because prices may rise in the next seven days is over 75%." So very powerful.

And the opposite, what is not analytics is, and not real true analytics, lots of marketing people call analytics if you can see it. If you've seen in this dashboard, it's a dashboard. And dashboards are important for humans to understand intelligence and doing [inaudible 00:16:45] is happening but it's the classic way of doing intelligence, it is in front of the screen, in front of the LCD, not behind it. Now the human has to make sense of things and again, this will stay there, it's very important, it's a very important discipline of us making sense of what is happening around us, all our visual perception is working. Our biggest input are our eyes, not all other senses. So we use them for data exploration utilization, but it's not really analytics taking action.

And why is it so important is because of the exploration shows itself in something which I typically talk about, what is the fire rate in this for non-performance? CEO on the pretty cushy situation, usually two to three years, and staying for two to three to four members. Sales professional, and let's say enterprise software selling and HR solution, usually has two to three quarters until the company realizes that person is not the right person for the fit. Very different, toughest area and many of you might be listening is recruiting. You know that if you start a new job for an enterprise, you can't bring in the right talent after two, three weeks, your job might be at risk. The comforting, well not so comforting thing is that only waiters staying in the two, three next unit of time measure, two, three hours of the timeframe would waiters have if they don't perform their place.

So the risk the closer you come to the operational world for non-performance for whatever reason. It might be the wrong territory for the sales rep, the wrong company for the CEO, they're following hiring funnel on the tools for a recruiter, it all may not be working.

So next one is "Lean Recruiting," which means I may cut out or not use a recruiter in the traditional way of sense, but will directly as a business user see what talent do I have, and I'll talk about that in a second on the next slide, to fill this position? It also means that recruiting has to be much, much faster to react on things. With traditional things, many enterprise users complain about for the right or wrong reasons I would say is 50/50. Reality is that the first round with the internal recruiter brings, or all the external recruiter or even the head hunter brings over is just a cannon fodder, it's not going to be the right candidate so [inaudible 00:18:57]. It's just going to be another two weeks until the real ones or the good ones show up.

So making more lean recruiting force is a key thing. One thing to enable it, I take an example here from football from the Miami Dolphins, is the talent depth chart. In sports you have the depth chart where you see every single position, you can see if a player doesn't play well or if a player gets injured and needs to get replaced. Who can play the position for you? So there's no long thinking, in the case of the game, because you have to do the substitution. You see the same thing in critical jobs in transportation, or in the military. If your heavy machine gunner goes down for whatever reason, there isn't going to be a little pow-wow, who's going to take over the heavy machine gun, for the reasons which we all can appreciate why.

So the same thing should be happening in the enterprise. Managers should see at any time, do I have the right people on the right jobs? Do I maybe even have a very easy way to optimize my talents, handle my team but I'm really responsible who's doing what and I might shift things for the sake of my team. It might not even be the better fit. It might be somebody running a certain job, it might be somebody need some job enrichment. I can see just do a little switch about what people in my team do. And then you expand that horizon to maybe the division, maybe the area where that manager works and maybe the whole company to see before I go outside, maybe there's somebody inside of the company who can do a better job.

And we know that one of the many reasons people leave their jobs is that they didn't see it further talent progression and often it's the case because they didn't know or they didn't look up in the internal recruiting both sides with other job opportunities out there. But if you turn that person around or the manager finding the talent which will help them augmenting the talent of their team, it's a significant part of making them work faster. And then why not give that manager the right access to outside help? They have to make the call anyway if they are going to place that person into that new job or vacancy, or if they're going to get rid of somebody because there's a better talent from the outside and maybe not get rid of them by letting them go, but maybe finding a better talent home, talking to another manager somewhere in the company where that person may be a better fit or not.

And then last but not least, important aspect especially for countries which have less flexible labor laws getting into the European side of this, for instance in France and Italy. In many situations, enterprise and the manager right away knows that job is not going to last and be here forever. Globalization, cost structures, reorganizations, lots of reasons why their job may not be staying. And I may not hire an employee full time because I know it's going to be hard for me to assign them, allocate them to a long term position, but I will not be able to move that talent out anymore. So you might be looking for freelancer, you might be looking for a contractor on that position.

So planning that whole talent depth chart for manager starting from talent available my team, talent available my enterprise, talent available outside for permanent positions outside of my enterprise, then even on temporary base, from a freelancer contract perspective, all the options which you want to enable with talent depth chart.

Next one is "TransBoarding," where these companies need to move faster and react faster, they need to move their talent around faster. I created this term, "TransBoarding," as a mixture between transfer and on-boarding. There is a lot of talk about on-boarding and on-boarding is very important when you bring in new talent in the company to bring the talent up to speed, making sure that we're good first two, three weeks experience, basically on-board, right? Many high potentials leave if you twin them up with a mediocre person's side. So you want to know who's really available for doing this but much, much more transfers of talent and you should take on-boarding as a transfer of talent from the outside, inside the enterprise is happening anyway as the enterprise operates. Usually transfer internal events are significantly higher than the external recruiting events. And companies are doing a bad job of bringing those internal transfers on-board and those who I talk more "TransBoarding" are making sure that I can ahead of time find a room for learning what my team is doing, learning what skills I need for the next job that I'm taking in a few months from now, and so on. Enterprise need to do a better job because they will have to shuffle people faster than ever before.

Performance Management is a key staple for enterprise is really something which is, and this the worst state. It's good to see that number of [inaudible 00:23:25] are taking action looking at that, it's good to see that number of startups are launching products to fix this in different ways. And then to be fair, it's not only a software problem, it's a human-nature problem. We don't like to get rated, we don't want to be rated, we don't want to rate other people. But generally, people don't like unpleasant conversations about people not performing. So there's this blood of human part of it but on the flip side might use that we do the software performance command inside didn't do a great, good enough job because all it didm, it automated the classic process as it was before, performance versus half yearly, or yearly use, which like all the information that happened that year, which like all the mini coaching, which like all the [00:24:08] review things and so on.

So good news is going to be fixed but it's really important for you to fix performance management because when performance management's broken all of talent management is dead. Let me quickly walk through that. [Inaudible 00:24:20] talent management dead? Well, you started recruiting, you don't know who is a great person to recruit because you don't have a profile how people evolve over the time in your enterprise into a more successful candidate. They look great on paper, but I keep hiring the same people who look great on people and don't perform well. How am I going to find that out? Next thing is you have those people on-board and want to on-board them. I mentioned the example already. Best thing to get rid of high potential person, millennial, is to pair them up with an older mediocre, or maybe even worse than mediocre, a baby-boomer. They will be running for fields very, very quickly.

So I need to know where those good people where I can rely on the new people so they learn more about the company, adopt best practices, find their way around there. And their performance management itself. We talked about them as a consequence of praise to holy grail of pay for performance. It's not something that enterprise can achieve because it would conflict performance correctly, I can also not pay for that. Equally on the learning side, I don't know what learning content where I'm spending maybe a lot of money even to send people to training, all kinds of norms acquisitions which they might be doing but I don't know if they change the way how they perform for the enterprise so I can't go back and say I need more money or less money and how I look at my training funds and which training is really effective to get my people better qualified.

And lastly, succession management equally here. If I don't know where my really good people are, I might make a mistake in succession management. Nothing demotivates people on a career path more than they see that obviously less qualified people get promoted ahead of them. So performance management is key thing for you to switch, to solve, and to address. As a consequence of that one, that is address you have to look at the learning challenge because if I need to move my talent faster, I need to do more to qualify my work force, my employee, my people. I need to find a way to use more modern media for them. I need to find a way for them to viably create content and share that content proactively. So you have to solve the learning challenge, the traditional LMS, the learning management systems will not do that because they are all part of last century best practices.

And you have to think about most flexible ways of running a company. Don't think about employees being long term and forever in the position. The position model by itself talks about so much static that only concrete fantasies can come up here. So you have to also project-based employment. Employee should not work for more than two, three years in a job at a maximum. And then they may continue it but there should be reviews if that's the right thing for them, if that's the right thing for the enterprise, if they should not be enriching of their position in any way.

And the "Freelance Economy." I already talked about the aging work force. I have an uncle, as you can hear from my accent I'm originally from Germany. He's making more money working six days a month as cobalt programmer than he ever did working full time. And he's a freelancer. And the companies he works for love him because he's the only one who can maintain their old, sophisticated cobalt rollers. But companies might turn this around and actively pursue people in the freelance are coming because they can't utilize them a hundred percent anymore, but they may even be either the broker for them, as a profession service provider, or they may employ them for a number of days, weeks, because they only need that specialty for a certain amount of time.

And then be "Non Monolithic." Monolithic sounds very scary, got a really interesting picture if you like [inaudible 00:27:43] he does lots of these just to get your mind going here, is it cannot be one solution, one size fits all. The future of HR software internally business software has to be, at least of course different businesses in your enterprise, across different divisions, you hire differently, you have different best practices. Trying to mail in the manufacturing company, blue-collar working for the recruiting solution in the same functionality like your white-collar working, doing the same amount of recruiting for North America than for Europe is very unlikely to have the same functionality.

The functionality might come from the vendor but the vendors have to inflict, not building classic monolithic software, one hammer fits for all, but they have to find different ways to enable best practices for HR and specifically here for recruiting. So look for vendors which don't try to run everything through the same process.

So summing up, don't be that HR leader to, like that sleep walking person here, walking through a nice starry night, or driving into a thunderstorm, whatever your sensation is and being one step away from falling down the ground. So to summarize it up, the nine drivers, the nine tools for you to become faster in HR is becoming a business user centric; is being enabled by technology, BigData for the first time brings together all the sources and more data means something. It's usually HR people are a little scary and skeptical and scared about but the good news is that you can ask all the questions now and you need to understand if there's one thing to understand from this presentation, there is homework, understand what BigData means and how we can leverage for your enterprise. On top of more data you can run analytics which helps you to make decisions because you all have less time. Simulate more options, find the better candidates, find the better talent. Come to a more leaner recruiting solution, both for the manager and the recruiter. Understand the concept of a talent depth chart which I introduced earlier so you can see seamlessly what talent's inside and outside of the enterprise, not even from a permanent hiring position, but even from a temporary position for you available. Enable something like TransBoarding. Do lots of focus on hiring the new pipeline. More people transfer usually in the enterprise, in jobs, than people get recruited apart from some seasonality at some retailers and so on. Of course, there's exceptions to everything. But look at making people more effective by transferring and on-boarding them, hence the word "TransBoarding."

Fix the performance management problem. If you don't performance manage successfully, then people pop open the champagne at the moment you cancel the performance review, people already know something is wrong. Enable 21st century learning and finding the learning in tiny pieces to everybody who needs them. And look for non monolithic solutions out there.

Five strategies for you to accelerate and to get there. One which we always recommend is look at the technical debt. We always accumulate technical debt decisions. If you're smart two, three, five years ago, don't look so smart and good anymore right now. It's like the nitrogen we exhale, it's normal part of living that you will accumulate technical debt but address proactively because it will scare you afterwards.

HR traditionally is always a huge integration problem. Tons of things, systems to integrate. Know when and who will do all of that for you on the HR side. There is nobody simply out there. Average HR department of a medium size company have over 50 interfaces including statutory interface I have to do once a year or once a month. But it's an integration fight so think of what integration fight for integration level help you. This is all part of your homework to be better at this.

And then start asking the right questions. How can we move faster? I gave you hopefully some ideas how to start that conversation. Use modern technology. Don't be afraid of that. We often see HR professions being concerned about the change of that. Don't be worried about this because if the decision is helping you to run sometime to focus on the relevant things, to be earlier home with your kids, why not use it for that?

And then look for vendors who have some of these attributes. Not all of them but have most of them so don't look for the unicorn or for the holy grail here. That doesn't exist. Life is full of comprise but look for vendors who are close enough and align if you're doing this.

Last, a shameless promotion here. Come to our conference November 4th and 6th. There's some room available for you. If you have any questions, this is how to contact me. Really feel free to reach out. I'm happy to share this deck with you, happy to answer your questions on Twitter, happy to email you, and check out my blog for the latest things and thought on next generation applications as well as the future of work.

Thank you so much for joining me, I appreciate it. Enjoy the event. There's going to be some great presentations after.